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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
be able to do this. bear in mind, this is not the egypt of hosey you in barrack. the egyptian government now are muzz lum brotherhood, and israel is in a less-tenable negotiating position and they remain military strong but do they want to go in on the ground take hundreds of thousands of casualties? that they've within boehnered will cause them to lose the international support they have. it's one of those 50-50 chance things but it's looking like everybody is looking fair way out. the question is, in a region like this, is there a way out. >> schieffer: well allen pizzey, who always shows up in the worst place where's the workforce things are going on, thank you. cbs news correspondent charlie dag tais on the other side of the border in gaza. charlie, bring us up to speed. what is the situation like there. >> reporter: well, the mood here is extremely teps, and the biggest worry is this dangerous and unpredictable situation may be about to get worse. as we drove through the northern part gaza strip, we were shown a couple of bombed out buildings, and one looked to be three or four stor
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
have added on to that the arab spring, which gave us new leadership in egypt. how scary is this that mohammed morsi will be a source for good. >> clearly they have a right to defend themselves, and they have to protect their citizens. we have to remember the united states it's as if washington d.c. was being attacked from the state of maryland. it's very, very serious what's happening there. i think as far as the arab spring, clearly the environment has changed, and i think the united states now is looking to morsi so look to hamas to get them to stop shooting. hopefully you can take advantage of the negative situation and start talking about peace. >> president morsi has his own problems at home too in terms of trying to be tough on hamas, which, after all, is part of the muslim brotherhood and the palestinians. do you think he can be helpful? has he been helpful? >> i don't know that he has. clearly we've benefitted from almost 40 years now of having peace partners between israel and egypt even though the egyptian government never told the people of egypt how important
, the muslim brotherhood in egypt, to leverage that possibility. israel. israel has been watching for the last six to nine months hamas bringing in longer and longer range missiles from iran. i think they saw this as an opportunity of necessity to take those out, missiles that can now hit tel aviv and jerusalem. egypt. this is a real problem for egypt. you have a new government there that needs money from the united states. they don't want to be caught in a struggle between israel and the palestinians. for iran, this is a godsend. it takes world attention off their nuclear program and puts pressure on all the more moderate forces in the arab world, puts them at the head. and lastly, syria, couldn't be a better day for bashar al assad. takes all the attention officer ya. no one is looking at the murderous campaign of assad against his own people. >> andrea mitchell, the diplomacy for president obama about to start a second term with all of the problems in the middle east. he's in bangkok this morning. he talked about his support for israel. >> there's no country on earth that would tolerate mis
in egypt. so that's where i think everybody would like to see it head. obama has worked hard to talk to them to try to steer it in that direction. will that happen? >> the most phones call that secretary clinton has made from the road have been to her counter-part in egypt. and they have been very clear that egypt has a relationship, they have the credibility and influence in the region to push hamas to stop the attacks. now, there is also a fair amount of funding being held up in washington right now that the egyptians need very immediately. remember, they weren't just one of the top recipients of foreign aid. they have a funding crisis. they have literally been to the point where they have had problems paying bills. so there is some immediate leverage to gets them to act immediately. whether that ends up being effective or not is another question. >> schieffer: well, do we think the administration-- obviously, i would guess they're advising the israelis not to invade. but what beyond that are they trying to do? is this an opening to start a-- the peace process to get it started aga
erupt in egypt. thousands demonstrating against a controversial grab for power by mohammed morsi. many saying he's acting like a modern day pharaoh. a big republican turns his back on the grover norquist tax pledge. is the gop preparing to give in to the president? is and thousands of people packing into stores today. watch your wallet. we'll tell you how the shopping season is really adding up. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening. i'm tom foreman. egypt erupts. thousands of angry egyptians have been protesting in opposition to a controversial power grabby egypt's president. at least 80 people have been injured and one killed in clashes with police who fired tear gas into the crowds. the unrest began after he issued a series of orders which allow him to run the country unchecked until a new constitution is written. morsi says his actions are meant to speed up reform and achieve political and social stability. >> translator: i have said beforened i repeat again, that i would never use a legislation against individuals, parties, men, women or muslims or christians for personal ga
as rockets continue to fill the air over israel and gaza and a planned cease fire, visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister may not be holding up. senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in the middle of it all. she has more for you from gaza city. >> reporter: what is happening on both sides of the gaza/israel border looks and feels like war to anyone who has to live with it, no matter what the governments on either side have declared. this is a small taste of what it fe felt like in gauza over a 24-hor period. >> that is exactly -- all right. i'm going to move out of the way and let you get a look here. i'm going to let you get a lock at what is going on. i can see the black smoke. it's difficult to capture on camera. you saw that flash. this is what we have been dealing with all day. we've also been dealing with -- i'm sorry, the power has just gone out. we have been dealing with power outages, wolf. this feels like war. it may not have been declared, but it feels like war to the civilians who live here. >> the booms and smoke from targeted air strikes from morning till night
went off in jerusalem, and egypt sends its prime minister to the gaza strip in a show of solidarity with the -- and did general petraeus pull a 180 degree turn in testimony today? in september he said it was videos and spontaneous demonstrations. today he said the cia knew all along it was a terrorist attack in libya. this story gets worse and worse, more and more complicated and we are going to parse through it. first up, with the fiscal cliff only 45 short days away, are we facing a stalemate or is there a new kissy huggy era coming to washington, d.c.? we've got two kissy huggy cnbc contributors. jared bernstein, former vice president, biden chief economist, and kissy huggy jim pethokoukis of the american enterprise institute. jimmy p., i love this new washington picture. and i don't want to be pessimistic. i want to be optimistic. maybe they can make a deal. but here's what i worry about, jimmy. here's what i fear. the republicans are conceding that they'll give a revenue -- a tax revenue portion by limiting deductions. but i don't see any spending cuts. the sequester has been c
its air strikes on gaza while egypt's prime minister visited. we expected a truce of around three hours. but it's very clear, now, that that has not happened. we've heard and felt the thuds of israeli strikes continue on the gaza strip. our gaza producer reported that two palestinians were killinged in the strikes, several were wounded. but the condition for this truce was that palestinian militants would stop firing on to southern israel. and they did not do that. we have seen ourselves, from right near our hotel, they are firing rockets. you hear the loud whoosh, the long vapor trails and the clouds of smoke. any talk of a truce is incorrect. >> what is the feeling you're getting? could israel send in ground troops? >> reporter: well, from the very beginning they talked about enlarging this operation. from the aerial offensive it's been so far, to include a ground invasion of gaza. yesterday, we saw large numbers of troops and tanks moving towards gaza. this morning, we heard that 16,000 reservists have been called up. this is the political season in israel. there's an election
in preparation for war. >> ben joins us by phone this morning. egypt's prime minister paid a visit to gaza. somehow that going so far? >> well, it was originally planned it would be a three-hour cease fire while the egyptian prime minister was making this visit to gaza. according to our sources, it doesn't appear either side significantly reduced their level of military activity in gaza. certainly before the sun came up there was an intense air attack on gaza itself. it may have been lessened somewhat in the morning while the prime minister was touring gaza. but after he's gone, it's expected to get back to the same pace. >> there are elections coming up not too long from now in israel. palestinians are saying that may be part of the impetus for israel to be taking action. >> certainly this is what you hear oftentimes. tc it was the casame case in the 2008, 2009 offensive. they say the leaders are motivated by a desire to show they're strong on hamas. in fact, we spoke to one palestinian lawmaker who stressed the point that really this is all about politics. >> and ben, of course, one of t
that country. in egypt a scene of devastation at a railroad crossing after a train hit a bus caring kindergarten students. the government says 49 children are dead, 18 others hurt. >>> back in this country, the coast guard is still searching for two oil rig workers after yesterday's explosion and fire on a platform in the gulf of mexico. >>> a 20-year-old missouri man is facing charges for an admitted plot to want a shooting spree at a theater showing the new twilight movie. the man's mother contacted police after she discovered he bought weapons like the ones used in the colorado movie theater massacre. >>> nfl great mike ditka say his doctors say he suffered a very minor stroke. ditka was playing cards yesterday when he suddenly had trouble speaking and using his hands. espn analyst says he feels good right now and it's not a big deal. and those are your fast five headlines. >>> we have this breaking news. israel and gaza exchange rocket fire for the fourth straight day. new video from the ground in gaza shows the damage from the israeli warplanes and other missiles. the warplanes
, all over the middle east has changed dramatically, in the last year, egypt is no longer one by a pro-american dictator but leaders of the muslim brotherhood. should president obama put more pressure on the egyptian government, even threaten to cut off aid, to get hamas to stop firing those rockets? >> he needs to exert every kind of pressure he can, chris to try to make sure it doesn't escalate into a full-blown war between the palestinians and the israelis and, whatever that takes. but, you know, the problem the israelis have is that these rockets are being fired on them, from places that they can't reach by flying over in the air and they are putting them in school yards where they are surrounded by schoolchildren and firing them from marketplaces crowded with people. and, israel has a right to protect itself. and, if sending ground troops in is the only way they can clean out these nests of rockets being fired at them, you know, you can't blame them for doing it. >> chris: all right, let's turn to benghazi. both of you held closed-door hearings this week with top administration of
of the war in gaza, when the visiting prime minister of egypt and the hamas prime minister touched the dead child. >> translator: i was here and i saw the child who was martyred. >> translator: the blood is on both of our hands. ours and the egyptian hands. >> reporter: we watched more children being brought into the hospital. the doctors say several have died, including a child burned to death. >> as a doctor, and as a human, i can't do anything for him because i know he has died now, you know? and you can't imagine if it's your baby, how do you feel? why? these raids, why? >> reporter: the influx of casualties, men, women, and children is overwhelming this hospital. underlying how this war is not just between soldiers. civilians on both sides of the border are enduring the grinding pain of loss. and what you're hearing behind me are the sounds of evening prayer beginning here in gaza city. throughout these prayers, oftentimes we're hearing again, the sounds of booms and we're seeing the lights of rockets headed toward israel. a lot of people are talk about whether or not war has been decl
regarding that anti-islamic film. there had been rioting in egypt and of course, this is the contradictory thread of the narrative here, that it was riots that -- in egypt that led to the attack on the embassy in libya on the consulate in libya. so he's going to talk about having these two threads of information but his sense right from the start that it was a terrorist attack by answar al sharia. a pretty murky group, loose collection of characters. >> this is interesting to me. just to be clear, your source is saying general petraeus knew almost immediately or felt that it was a terrorist attack, knew the group involved, even though he told members of congress three days after the attack that it could have been spontaneous and there's also the statement made by the director of national intelligence on the dni the end of october who put out a statement saying in the wake of criticism of ambassador rice, saying that early reports indicated it might have been linked to -- might have been a spontaneous demonstration and ambassador rice went out on sunday saying -- five days after, saying it
between an escalation of the conflict and the search for a cease-fire. egypt within recent days aligning itself with palestinians, but still leading the push to try to end the fighting. reports say an israeli envoy is in cairo for talks to arrange for a truce, but for now, a break through looks distant. the sound now of what is coming. >> people running for their lives, looking for cover. as gaza militants launch dozens of rockets targeting israel's heartland. and just a flavor now of what's been happening night and day, three rockets aimed at tel aviv, the commercial capital of the jewish state. this was not that long ago, coming to the rescue, israel's iron dome missile defense system shooting down both those rockets before they could hit anything. israel also keeping up the pressure, pounding militant targets in gaza. these pictures show a building used by hamas and the sites of a war plane and being wiped out completely by a direct hit. meanwhile, president obama doing some kind of a balancing act now, warning israel about the dangers of expanding its air assault into a ground war, w
but egypt and possibly beyond. jenna: let's focus on syria. this conflict has been going on for 19 months. woe just heard news that the opposition group there elected a leader, a christian, the second-in-command being a member of the muslim brotherhood. we keep hearing that the opposition forces are very amorphous, we can't side with them because they don't know who they are. how do we interrupt the forces if they are keith a network and are at work in this region? >> jenna, very interesting we moved from we don't know who they are to we very well know who they are at this time. the central force and opposition is the muslim brotherhood. there is consensus among the region and observe. >> the number two of the new group, is a number two of the muslim brotherhood in syria. the chief, the new president of the council is indeed a christian. he is secular. he has been very liberal. he will oppose the muslim brotherhood. the problem, jenna, he doesn't have influence. those who control the ground are islamist militias. those who control most of the institutions are muslim brotherhood. you have
is the role of egypt with its leadership. a relationship that is much closer now to hamas. is that something that the white house should be concerned about? i mean, that really does seem like really a wild card in all of this. >> suzanne, i don't think it's a wild card. you are spot on. they do need to be concerned about it. more importantly, they need to do something about it to insure that israel is able to prosecute what it needs against hamas and that egypt and the muslim brotherhood stay out of any type of direct engagement or support to what is taking place in gaza right now. that would truly inflame and kind of put into greater can i ones what's taking place in the middle east, so israel needs to breathe -- apologies. egypt needs to breathe through their nose and just stay where they are. hamas and israel are going to have to work this out, and they don't need to have other folks meddling other than to try to get them to calm down, you know, settle the situation a little bit. >> to the other story that we're following. obviously, the scandal involving the former cia director general d
to egypt hoping the leaders can solve the mess. >> the egyptian have an interest in the region not exploding. they will have to take serious steps to make it clear to hamas they will lose support. >> egypt watch what you do and how you do it. you are teetering with the congress of having aid cut off if you continue to incite violence. >> brian: what about the arab democracy? our next guest is a former cia agent with the unit. michael, another conflict between the israelis and palestinians. and the center piece is gaza. what is different now? >> what is different now, america had invested in 50 years in tyranny to make sure israel was suppressed and the america protected. when arab spring came. people including senator graham predicted just a secular democracy and it was a arab spring of secularism. people will turn in a time of turmoil to their faith or what they believed in for a thousand years. we have governments in libya where our people were killed and now in egypt that are going to support their breathern. >> brian: what is the best conclusion and best way to end. >> i am
of people. meanwhile, egypt and president hoe ma'am head morsi says discussions are under way in cairo and arab league foreign ministers will visit on tuesday. >>> after a marathon stay in space, williams handed over command of the international space station yesterday after the calling it home for the last four months. she landed in kazakhstan tonight along with astronauts from japan and russia. president barack obama monitoring the conflict in the middle east as he travels through asia. today in thailand, he said the u.s. is working with all parties to end violence. he made history becoming the first u.s. president to visit myanmar. the president wraps up his three-nation asian tour with a stop in cambodia. >>> state department updating hugh it deploys security for diplomatic facilities around the globe now. secretary of state hillary clinton and the defense department will monitor where forces are deployed so they can travel to help during emergencies, if needed. the change comes amid congressional hearings over how the obama administration handled security crisis in benghazi, libya
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)